Research Monitor
Publication Database for Development Research

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Featured Publications

Biodiversity Loss is a Development Issue

24 May 2019
Read more: Biodiversity Loss is a Development Issue (external link)

2019/04 – International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED); research paper; Author(s): Dilys Roe, Nathalie Seddon, Joanna Elliott

On the occasion of the recent release of the IPBES Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, we'd like to highlight this issue paper by the International Institute for Environment and Development (IEED): "This global biodiversity crisis is hitting the poorest communities first and hardest, because they can ill-afford to ‘buy in’ biodiversity’s previously-free goods and services (and are already bearing the brunt of climate change).So why does the development community often ignore biodiversity loss? This paper unpicks misunderstandings and sets out the evidence that biodiversity loss is much more than an environmental problem – it is an urgent development challenge.

The Economics of the Syrian Refugee Crisis in Neighboring Countries. The Case of Lebanon

25 Apr 2019
Read more: The Economics of the Syrian Refugee Crisis in Neighboring Countries. The Case of Lebanon (external link)

2019/04 – Agence Française de Développement (AFD); research paper; Author(s): Mohamed ali Marouani et al

This paper investigates the effects of a massive displacement of workers from a war-torn economy on the economy of a neighboring country. Applying a general equilibrium approach to the Lebanese economy, it explores effects from various components of the crisis on the labor market, the production apparatus, and macroeconomic indicators. Along with previous literature, its findings suggest limited or no adverse effects on high-skilled native workers, but a negative impact on the most vulnerable Lebanese workers is found. When aid takes the form of investment subsidies, significantly better growth and labor market prospects arise, recalling the necessity of complementing humanitarian aid with development aid to succeed in achieving long-term objectives. This may however not be politically viable in a context where refugees are considered as temporary.

When the Drugs Don’t Work – Antibiotic Resistance as a Global Development Problem

14 Mar 2019
Read more: When the Drugs Don’t Work – Antibiotic Resistance as a Global Development Problem (external link)

2019/02 – Dag Hammarskjoeld Foundation (DHF); research paper; Author(s): Maarten van der Heijden et al

Why is there a need to address antibiotic resistance in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals? Because antibiotics play a crucial role in many more areas of life than most people imagine. However, antibiotics are starting to lose their effectiveness due to resistant infections, and the consequences will be far-reaching if decisive and rapid action is not taken globally and systematically. Antibiotic resistance seriously jeopardises the achievement of several of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Therefore, antibiotic resistance must be included in the work on sustainable development, and should be seen as a strong additional reason to urgently increase the work on the Sustainable Development Goals. The Dag Hammerskjoeld Foundation has published a report on how antibiotic resistance is linked to the Sustainable Development Goals.

Social Protection in East Africa - Harnessing the Future

05 Mar 2019
Read more: Social Protection in East Africa - Harnessing the Future (external link)

2019/02 – OECD Development Centre (OECD/DC); research paper; Author(s): Oecd

This study by the OECD Development Centre is now available in open access. It identifies possible futures and explores new paths for action in six countries in East Africa – Ethiopia, Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. It highlights seven grand challenges that confront social protection policy makers in the region and discusses which policy directions are most appropriate for tackling today’s social protection needs and preparing for those of tomorrow. A number of these challenges, such as rapid population growth and urbanisation, persistent informality, low domestic resource mobilisation and climate change, are common to sub-Saharan Africa as a whole; the methodology and approach used here will be applicable to many other countries across the region.

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