Past Highlights

‘Leaving No One Behind’ Through Enabling Climate-Resilient Economic Development in Dryland Regions

21 Aug 2018
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2018/07 – Overseas Development Institute (ODI); briefing paper; Author(s): Guy Jobbins et al. - Details

‘Leave no one behind’ is a principle central to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This policy briefing, based on five years’ research by the PRISE project, puts forward the view that governments, development partners and investors must prioritise investments to tackle poverty and climate vulnerability in dryland areas to ensure that no one is left behind and achieve multiple Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The briefing adds that public policies and investments by national governments and development partners which recognise the seasonality, mobility and informality of dryland economies as strengths, and create an enabling environment for private actors in these regions, hold real potential to spur progress towards sustainable achievement of the SDGs, leave no one behind and the global goals on climate adaptation.

Towards Paris-Compatible Climate Governance Frameworks: An Overview of Findings From Recent Research Into 2050 Climate Laws and Strategies

21 Aug 2018
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2018/06 – Institut du développement durable et des relations internationales (IDDRI); Author(s): Andreas Rüdiger, et al. - Details

This report seeks to draw upon the composite lessons learned at domestic and subnational levels and aims to respond to three fundamental questions facing policymakers and stakeholders at national and subnational levels:
• Why do we need strong national climate governance frameworks and how do we get there?
• What are the key ingredients for an effective national climate governance framework?
• What are the linkages and resulting chal - lenges arising from the links between national and multinational governance frameworks?

Climate Change: A Threat to Child Food Security in the Indian Sundarbans

17 Jul 2018
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2018/06 – Institute of Development Studies (IDS), Brighton; Future Health Systems Issue Brief 1; Author(s): Upasona Ghosh, Shibaji Bose - Details

The Sundarbans, the mangrove forest delta shared both by India and Bangladesh, is among the worst hit regions of climate change in the world. Even though food insecurities due to climate change are felt across the region, the distribution of vulnerabilities is largely uneven depending upon existing climatic and social intersections.Within the context of socio-cultural and political dynamics, and rapid globalization, efforts to respond to, mitigate, or adapt to climate change needs to address issues of equity and social justice, posing both challenges and opportunities.

Syrian Refugee Children in the Middle East and Europe - Integrating the Young and Exiled

17 Jul 2018
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2018/07 – Department of Society and Globalisation, Roskilde University (RUC); Routledge Studies in Middle Eastern Society; Editor(s): Michelle Pace, Somdeep Sen - Details

The book is premised on the underlying conception of refugee children as not merely a vulnerable contingent of the displaced Syrian population, but one that possesses a certain agency for change and progress. In this vein, the various contributions aim to not just de-securitize the ‘conversation’ on migration that frequently centres on the presumed insecurity that refugees personify. They also de-securitize the figure and image of the refugee. Through the stories of the youngest and most vulnerable, they demonstrate that refugee children are not mere opaque figures on whom we project our insecurities. Instead, they embody potentials and opportunities for progress that we need to nurture, as young refugees find themselves compelled to both negotiate the practical realities of a life in exile, and situate themselves in changing and unfamiliar socio-cultural contexts. Drawing on extensive field research, this edited volume points in the direction of a new rights based framework which will safeguard the future of these children and their well-being.

What Politics? Youth and Political Engagement in Africa

17 Jul 2018
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2018/05 – Nordic Africa Institute (NAI); book; Author(s): Elina Oinas, et al. (Ed.) - Details

What Politics? Youth and Political Engagement in Africa examines the diverse experiences of being young in today’s Africa. It offers new perspectives to the roles and positions young people take to change their life conditions both within and beyond the formal political structures and institutions. The contributors represent several social science disciplines, and provide well-grounded qualitative analyses of young people’s everyday engagements by critically examining dominant discourses of youth, politics and ideology. Despite focusing on Africa, the book is a collective effort to better understand what it is like to be young today, and what the making of tomorrow’s yesterday means for them in personal and political terms.

Creating Wealth Without Labour? Emerging Contours of a New Techno-Economic Landscape

19 Jun 2018
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2018/05 – German Development Institute, Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE); Discussion Paper 11/2018; Author(s): Wilfried Lütkenhorst - Details

This discussion paper reviews the topical debate around the implications of innovative digital technologies for future patterns of competitiveness, employment, equality, the international division of labour and resource efficiency. It focusses on digital production technologies applied in the manufacturing sector and adopts a global economic perspective in a 10- to 15-year time horizon. The leading research questions are: How is the digital revolution likely to impact the future of industrialisation? How will it affect the relative positions of developed and developing countries in global competition? What are the implications for industrial policy?

Towards the Urgent Elimination of Hazardous Child Labour

19 Jun 2018
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2018/06 – Report; Author(s): International Labour Organization (Ilo) - Details

This report brings together and assesses new research on hazardous child labour, following the ILO’s last report on this subject in 2011. The report demonstrates that we have extensive experience and an ample evidence base to assist us in tackling hazardous child labour.

Incentives to Labour Migration and Agricultural Productivity

19 Jun 2018
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2018/04 – United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER); WIDER Working Paper 45/2018; Author(s): Marie Albertine Djuikom - Details

This paper investigates the effect of internal labour migration on agricultural productivity of rural households in Uganda. Since households select themselves into migration this raises the endogeneity problem. In order to account for the endogeneity of the migration decision and the fact that the effect might be different from one household to another, I model the households’ decisions to participate in migration along with their investment in agricultural productivity using the Bayesian treatment analysis. This approach allows me to self-match each household and to estimate a distribution for the counterfactual outcome.

Aligning Agricultural and Rural Development (ARD) and Trade Policies to Improve Sustainable Development Impact

23 May 2018
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2018/02 – European Centre for Development Policy Management (ECDPM); ECDPM & GDPRD discussion paper; Author(s): Paul Engel - Details

Development partners are making efforts to strengthen coherence between their Trade and Agricultural and Rural Development (ARD) policies and interventions. This is key to enhance synergies for sustainable development, or at the very least to avoid one policy undermining the developmental effects of the other. It requires enhanced dialogue and cooperation between trade and ARD communities. This exploratory study seeks to analyse the ongoing debate and cooperation between ARD and trade, and aid for trade departments.

Can Group Farms Outperform Individual Family Farms? Empirical Insights From India

23 May 2018
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2018/08 – Global Development Institute (GDI); World Development; Author(s): Bina Agarwal - Details

Is there an alternative model to small family farming that could provide sustainable livelihoods to millions of resource-constrained and often non-viable smallholders in developing countries? Could group farming constitute such an alternative, wherein smallholders voluntarily pool land, labour and capital to create larger farms that they manage collectively?