News Archive
for category “News from EADI”

See also:

EADI Home

New on our blog: Changing research practices in times of Covid – Insights from an international fishbowl

Read more: New on our blog: Changing research practices in times of Covid – Insights from an international fishbowl (external link)
22 Jul 2021

By Basile Boulay | EADI/ISS Blog Series

The closing plenary of the 2021 EADI ISS conference opened the floor to all participants, encouraging them to reflect on their changing research practices in times of Covid through a virtual fishbowl format. How has the pandemic changed our research practice? How do losses and gains balance out? What are the specific challenges faced by researchers in the Global South? Here is what our participants thought:

New on our blog: Questioning development: What lies ahead?

Read more: New on our blog: Questioning development: What lies ahead? (external link)
21 Jul 2021

By Christiane Kliemann | EADI/ISS Blog Series

Development Studies requires “an epistemological and ontological change” write Elisabetta Basile and Isa Baud in the introduction to the recent EADI volume “Building Development Studies for a New Millennium”. The planned sequel of the book will take this analysis one step further and explore viable ways to build on both the critique of development as such, as well as the growing demand to decolonize knowledge production. The plenary session on “Questioning Development – Towards Solidarity, Decoloniality, Conviviality” at the recent #Solidarity2021 conference hosted a discussion by four contributors to the book which is currently in preparation for publication in 2023. The discussion is summarized here.

New on our blog: For the redistribution of water, framing matters!

Read more: New on our blog: For the redistribution of water, framing matters! (external link)
20 Jul 2021

By Lize Swartz | EADI/ISS Blog Series

In the face of increasing pressure on global water availability, a degree of inventiveness in finding just and sustainable ways to ensure access to water is required. The redistribution of water is one possible way in which this could be done. But ongoing research on elite responses to a recent water scarcity crisis in South Africa shows that the redistribution of water resources will not go uncontested by water elites and that existing narratives on the sharing of water are not creating the extent of solidarity needed.

New on our blog: COVID-19: solidarity as counter-narrative to crisis capitalism

Read more: New on our blog: COVID-19: solidarity as counter-narrative to crisis capitalism (external link)
07 Jul 2021

By Christiane Kliemann | EADI/ISS Blog Series

The absence of serious measures to protect citizens from the COVID-19 virus in countries such as India and Brazil, as well as vaccine grabbing by countries in the Global North, have created much avoidable suffering, mainly, but not only, in the Global South. Nearly a year and a half after the outbreak of the pandemic, hope for transformative change rests mainly on the countless practices of solidarity by local communities worldwide. It therefore comes as no surprise that all speakers at the opening plenary of the EADI ISS #Solidarity2021 conference were torn between pessimism and hope when taking stock of solidarity in times of COVID-19.

Mapping Power and Inequality: Institutions and Individuals. Dudley Seers Lecture by Rohini Pande, 1 July, 16.00-17.30 CEST

Read more: Mapping Power and Inequality: Institutions and Individuals. Dudley Seers Lecture by Rohini Pande, 1 July, 16.00-17.30 CEST
01 Jul 2021

We are happy to announce that the Dudley Seers Lecture which precedes our upcoming General Conference "Solidarity, Peace and Social Justice" will be held by Rohini Pande, Henry J. Heinz II Professor of Economics and Director of the Economic Growth Center, Yale University. Since 2008, the Dudley Seers Lecture has been an inherent part of the EADI General Conferences. Remembering one of the founding members and the first EADI president, this lecture allows a renowned speaker to formally set the tone for the debates at and around the conference.

Pande's talk will explore how power structures - within households, communities and countries – are determined by informal and formal institutions. It will analyze how inequality of power and economic inequality interact within these institutions.

Better cities after COVID-19. Transformative urban recovery in the global South

Read more: Better cities after COVID-19. Transformative urban recovery in the global South (external link)
25 Jun 2021

2021/06 – International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED); research paper; Author(s): Alice Sverdlik & Anna Walnycki

proposes a novel framework to support a transformative recovery in cities of the global South. COVID-19 has created a critical juncture in the development of cities in the global South. Local governments and grassroots organisations have led urban responses that have been pivotal in shaping the pandemic’s outcomes for low-income residents. Yet policymakers have had only a limited focus on the pandemic’s urban dimensions. Synthesising evidence on the pandemic’s impacts in urban areas, this issue paper outlines a set of policy priorities and develops a framework with guiding principles for co-creating inclusive, forward-looking pathways out of the crisis.

New on our blog: How online conferences can contribute to social justice: lessons from organizing the EADI ISS Conference 2021

Read more: New on our blog: How online conferences can contribute to social justice: lessons from organizing the EADI ISS Conference 2021 (external link)
24 Jun 2021

How can a conference contribute to solidarity, peace and social justice? Well, maybe by organizing it fully online. We never expected this to work so amazingly.

Let us be honest to you from the beginning: we have never organized an online conference before. We feel like we are inventing the wheel in many ways, because many things are absolutely new to us. We’ve never had to do this. But now that we have organized the EADI-ISS Conference 2021 #Solidarity2021, which is to start in just a few days, we know one thing for sure: we will never organize a conference again without providing substantial online participation facilities.

New on our blog: A Canopy of Hope

Read more: New on our blog: A Canopy of Hope (external link)
15 Jun 2021

By Tim Jackson

The slopes of Mount Kenya, in the district of Nyeri in Kenya, were once scattered with hundreds of wild fig trees called mugumos in the local (Kikuyu) language. Their tough bark was the colour of elephant skin. Their gnarled roots drilled deep channels through the rocky earth to drink thirstily from the groundwater below. The trees bore a small round fruit which ripened in the sun to a warm orange colour. And their branches were alive with the song of the tinkerbirds and turacos who feasted there.

Child Poverty and Social Protection in Central and Western Africa

Read more: Child Poverty and Social Protection in Central and Western Africa  (external link)
10 Jun 2021

2021/05 – Comparative Research Programme on Poverty (CROP), International Science Council (ISC); research paper; Author(s): Gustave Nébié, Chinyere Emeka-Anuna, Felix Fofana N'Zu, Enrique Delamonica

This open access book assesses various child poverty trends in the region. Child poverty is distinct, conceptually, and different, quantitatively, from adult poverty. It requires its own independent measurement—otherwise half of the population in developing countries may be unaccounted for when assessing poverty reduction. This book posits that child poverty should be measured based on constitutive rights of poverty, using a multi-dimensional approach. The argument is supported by chapters actually applying and expanding this approach.

New on our blog: On Coloniality/Decoloniality in Knowledge Production and Societies

Read more: New on our blog: On Coloniality/Decoloniality in Knowledge Production and Societies (external link)
02 Jun 2021

By Henning Melber

Social organisations tend to be based on asymmetric power relations – almost always, almost everywhere. Inequality characterises interaction both inside and in between societies. Class-based hierarchies, peppered by gender imbalances, sexism, racism, xenophobia, homophobia and many other forms of discrimination are the order of the day, both nationally as well as internationally.

News Archive

Categories