News Archive
for 2021-6

Is there a moral imperative for development researchers to act as advocates?

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28 Jun 2021

The Research Communications Working Group is pleased to invite all registered participants of the #Solidarity2021 conference to ist roundtable on 8 July, 11.00-12.15 CEST!

Better cities after COVID-19. Transformative urban recovery in the global South

Read more: Better cities after COVID-19. Transformative urban recovery in the global South (external link)
25 Jun 2021

2021/06 – International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED); research paper; Author(s): Alice Sverdlik & Anna Walnycki

proposes a novel framework to support a transformative recovery in cities of the global South. COVID-19 has created a critical juncture in the development of cities in the global South. Local governments and grassroots organisations have led urban responses that have been pivotal in shaping the pandemic’s outcomes for low-income residents. Yet policymakers have had only a limited focus on the pandemic’s urban dimensions. Synthesising evidence on the pandemic’s impacts in urban areas, this issue paper outlines a set of policy priorities and develops a framework with guiding principles for co-creating inclusive, forward-looking pathways out of the crisis.

New on our blog: How online conferences can contribute to social justice: lessons from organizing the EADI ISS Conference 2021

Read more: New on our blog: How online conferences can contribute to social justice: lessons from organizing the EADI ISS Conference 2021 (external link)
24 Jun 2021

How can a conference contribute to solidarity, peace and social justice? Well, maybe by organizing it fully online. We never expected this to work so amazingly.

Let us be honest to you from the beginning: we have never organized an online conference before. We feel like we are inventing the wheel in many ways, because many things are absolutely new to us. We’ve never had to do this. But now that we have organized the EADI-ISS Conference 2021 #Solidarity2021, which is to start in just a few days, we know one thing for sure: we will never organize a conference again without providing substantial online participation facilities.

New on our blog: A Canopy of Hope

Read more: New on our blog: A Canopy of Hope (external link)
15 Jun 2021

By Tim Jackson

The slopes of Mount Kenya, in the district of Nyeri in Kenya, were once scattered with hundreds of wild fig trees called mugumos in the local (Kikuyu) language. Their tough bark was the colour of elephant skin. Their gnarled roots drilled deep channels through the rocky earth to drink thirstily from the groundwater below. The trees bore a small round fruit which ripened in the sun to a warm orange colour. And their branches were alive with the song of the tinkerbirds and turacos who feasted there.

Child Poverty and Social Protection in Central and Western Africa

Read more: Child Poverty and Social Protection in Central and Western Africa  (external link)
10 Jun 2021

2021/05 – Comparative Research Programme on Poverty (CROP), International Science Council (ISC); research paper; Author(s): Gustave Nébié, Chinyere Emeka-Anuna, Felix Fofana N'Zu, Enrique Delamonica

This open access book assesses various child poverty trends in the region. Child poverty is distinct, conceptually, and different, quantitatively, from adult poverty. It requires its own independent measurement—otherwise half of the population in developing countries may be unaccounted for when assessing poverty reduction. This book posits that child poverty should be measured based on constitutive rights of poverty, using a multi-dimensional approach. The argument is supported by chapters actually applying and expanding this approach.

New on our blog: On Coloniality/Decoloniality in Knowledge Production and Societies

Read more: New on our blog: On Coloniality/Decoloniality in Knowledge Production and Societies (external link)
02 Jun 2021

By Henning Melber

Social organisations tend to be based on asymmetric power relations – almost always, almost everywhere. Inequality characterises interaction both inside and in between societies. Class-based hierarchies, peppered by gender imbalances, sexism, racism, xenophobia, homophobia and many other forms of discrimination are the order of the day, both nationally as well as internationally.

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