News Archive
for 2018-8

Re-thinking Development Research

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29 Aug 2018

Despite a broad consensus that global problems require global solutions, academia and research remain dominated by Western scholars and epistemologies. Western knowledge and its forms of production are considered as universally applicable and relevant while Southern knowledge(s) continue to be marginalized and/or silenced.

EADI Panel at Development Research Conference 2018, 22-23 August, Gothenburg

Read more: EADI Panel at Development Research Conference 2018, 22-23 August, Gothenburg
22 Aug 2018

EADI in collaboration with the EADI Working Group on "Post-/Decolonial Perspectives on Development" is hosting the panel "Rethinking development research: objects and subjects in development studies" on 23 August from 9 to 10.30 a.m.

Darfuri migration from Sudan to Europe: from displacement to despair

Read more: Darfuri migration from Sudan to Europe: from displacement to despair (external link)
21 Aug 2018

2018/09 – Overseas Development Institute (ODI); research paper; Author(s): Susanne Jaspars and Margie Buchanan-Smith Details

Significant numbers of Sudanese, many from Darfur, have made the journey from Sudan to Europe in search of safety and a better life. While there has been significant interest in Sudan as a transit country for migration from Africa to Europe, little attention has been paid to Sudan as a source of migrants and refugees. Yet the Sudanese were the fifth, sixth and seventh largest categories of migrants and refugees arriving in Italy in 2015, 2016 and 2017, respectively. This study documents for the first time the experiences of young Darfuris fleeing Sudan for Europe. It aims to deepen understanding of the trends, drivers and causes of migration and displacement from Darfur. The report also explores the impact of migration to Europe on families and communities left behind, and on the wider political economy of Darfur.

Tackling the triggers of violence-induced displacement - The contribution of the African Peace and Security Architecture and African Governance Architecture

Read more: Tackling the triggers of violence-induced displacement - The contribution of the African Peace and Security Architecture and African Governance Architecture (external link)
21 Aug 2018

2018/09 – European Centre for Development Policy Management (ECDPM); Discussion Paper 228; Author(s): Anna Knoll; Lidet Tadesse ShiferawDetails

Displacement induced by violence affects the African continent disproportionately.The African Union (AU) has developed two key continental instruments to potentially address this issue. The first is the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA), for the prevention and management of conflicts. The second is the African Governance Architecture (AGA), that promotes democratic governance in the continent. The AU makes use of these two instruments to tackle governance, peace and security challenges, which are often at the heart of violence-induced displacement. The links between APSA and AGA activities and how these can reduce or alter the triggers of violence-induced displacement have not yet been explored in-depth. This paper tries to understand whether and how the interventions by the AU and the Regional Economic Communities (RECs)...

Behavior in Reverse: Reasons for Return Migration

Read more: Behavior in Reverse: Reasons for Return Migration (external link)
21 Aug 2018

2018/08 – Centre for Development Research (ZEF); Discussion Papers on Development Policy No. 26 5; Author(s): Oded Stark Details

Research shows numerous motives for migration, but fewer reasons for return migration. This paper aims to correct this imbalance. Twelve reasons for return migration are presented and briefly discussed. The reasons listed are derived from research on migration conducted in the course of the past three and a half decades. The purpose of the paper is to pull together the insights gained from that research so as to formulate a base for future inquiry, both analytical and empirical. In addition, just as research on motives for migration can help to establish the reasons for reutrn migration, research on the latter can help to deepen understaining of the former. Moreover, in many circumstances and for various reasons, countries that host migrants may want them to leave. In such cicumstances, entacting policies that align with motvies for return migration will be...

How to Reduce Poverty and Address Climate Change? An Empirical Cross-Country Analysis and the Roles of Economic Growth and Inequality (copy 1)

Read more: How to Reduce Poverty and Address Climate Change? An Empirical Cross-Country Analysis and the Roles of Economic Growth and Inequality (copy 1) (external link)
21 Aug 2018

2018/06 – Global Development Institute (GDI); Working Paper 32; Author(s): Daniele Malerba - Details

How can countries eradicate poverty while also addressing climate change? Despite the necessity to deal with both issues simultaneously, no study has analysed the empirical relationship between the two aforementioned goals and the factors that drive these interlinkages. This paper addresses this gap in the literature, using data from 135 developed and developing countries. The research underlines the tension between policy perspectives at the national and global levels. Economic growth, despite the potential to reduce the national carbon intensity of poverty reduction for the numerous countries that lie below the estimated turning points, needs to confront global environmental boundaries. Given this tension, the paper concludes that, alongside developed countries drastically reducing their emissions, developing countries should follow alternative development paths. Among them, a...

‘Leaving No One Behind’ Through Enabling Climate-Resilient Economic Development in Dryland Regions

Read more: ‘Leaving No One Behind’ Through Enabling Climate-Resilient Economic Development in Dryland Regions (external link)
21 Aug 2018

2018/07 – Overseas Development Institute (ODI); briefing paper; Author(s): Guy Jobbins et al. - Details

‘Leave no one behind’ is a principle central to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This policy briefing, based on five years’ research by the PRISE project, puts forward the view that governments, development partners and investors must prioritise investments to tackle poverty and climate vulnerability in dryland areas to ensure that no one is left behind and achieve multiple Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The briefing adds that public policies and investments by national governments and development partners which recognise the seasonality, mobility and informality of dryland economies as strengths, and create an enabling environment for private actors in these regions, hold real potential to spur progress towards sustainable achievement of the SDGs, leave no one behind and the global goals on climate adaptation.

Towards Paris-Compatible Climate Governance Frameworks: An Overview of Findings From Recent Research Into 2050 Climate Laws and Strategies

Read more: Towards Paris-Compatible Climate Governance Frameworks: An Overview of Findings From Recent Research Into 2050 Climate Laws and Strategies (external link)
21 Aug 2018

2018/06 – Institut du développement durable et des relations internationales (IDDRI); Author(s): Andreas Rüdiger, et al. - Details

This report seeks to draw upon the composite lessons learned at domestic and subnational levels and aims to respond to three fundamental questions facing policymakers and stakeholders at national and subnational levels:
• Why do we need strong national climate governance frameworks and how do we get there?
• What are the key ingredients for an effective national climate governance framework?
• What are the linkages and resulting chal - lenges arising from the links between national and multinational governance frameworks?

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