News Archive

Video: Governance and societal notions of equality and inequality

Read more: Video: Governance and societal notions of equality and inequality
05 Jan 2018

Nicky Pouw of University of Amsterdam explains the most important results of the SHPIG project in a short video.

"We looked at two social protection policies: cash transfers to the poor and free social health insurance, in both Ghana and Kenya. We specifically looked at the interaction between the two policies. Many African governments are formalising their social support systems to fight poverty. This is highly political due to budget constrains and nepotism. How can these governments extend social protection through a more integrated and inclusive system?"

Local-International Relations and the Recalibration of Peacebuilding Interventions Insights From the ‘Laboratory‘ of Bougainville and Beyond

Read more: Local-International Relations and the Recalibration of Peacebuilding Interventions Insights From the ‘Laboratory‘ of Bougainville and Beyond (external link)
07 Dec 2017

2017/10 – Institute for Development and Peace (INEF); INEF-Report 112; Author(s): Volker Boege et al. - Details

The report addresses the micro-level as a key dimension of post-conflict peacebuilding interventions, with a particular focus on the relationships and interactions of international and local actors. What changes do occur with regard to their perceptions, expectations, attitudes and activities in the course of interactions? Can we identify experiences and mechanisms that lead to a re-articulation of relationships and interactions and, consequently, a recalibration of the overall peacebuilding exercise, e.g. with regard to more (or less) cooperation, more (or less) mutual trust, more (or less) animosities and misunderstandings, and more (or less) legitimacy?

Does Peace Trickle Down? Micro-Level Evidence from Africa

Read more: Does Peace Trickle Down? Micro-Level Evidence from Africa (external link)
07 Dec 2017

2017/10 – Arnold Bergsträsser Institut (ABI); ABI Working Paper No.4; Author(s): Martin Ottmann, Felix Haass - Details

Do peace agreements generate socio-economic peace dividends for citizens in post-war countries? While much research has focused on the elite level implications of peace agreements for the survival of peace, little is known about the micro-level, redistributive effects of peace agreements. We investigate the impact of peace agreement provisions and their implementation—specifically power-sharing arrangements—on individually reported measures of well-being. Building on a political economy theory of post-war politics, we conceptualize rebel organizations as political organizations that engage in distributive politics after conflict.

Beyond Panglong: Myanmar’s National Peace and Reform Dilemma

Read more: Beyond Panglong: Myanmar’s National Peace and Reform Dilemma (external link)
07 Dec 2017

2017/09 – Transnational Institute (TNI); briefing paper - Details

This Myanmar Policy Briefing analyses the country’s ethnic peace and reform dilemmas, charting past initiatives and political consequences since independence until the present. From the time of the Panglong Conference in 1947, there have been attempts to achieve peace and national reconciliation during every era of government, but all have proven unsuccessful.

Workshop on the “Financial Inclusion of Third Country Nationals" on 4 December 2017 in Brussels

Read more: Workshop on the “Financial Inclusion of Third Country Nationals" on 4 December 2017 in Brussels
21 Nov 2017

The Centro Studi di Politica Internazionale (CeSPI), the Italian Ministry of Internal Affairs and the European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI) are pleased to announce a public event on financial inclusion of third country nationals to be held in Brussels. The event aims at presenting the scope and results of the Italian National Observatory for the financial inclusion of migrants, implemented by CeSPI, and other examples from European countries, and to enable an exchange between stakeholders.

Why Do Development Finance Institutions Use Offshore Financial Centres?

Read more: Why Do Development Finance Institutions Use Offshore Financial Centres? (external link)
21 Nov 2017

2017/10 – Overseas Development Institute (ODI); research paper; Author(s): Paddy Carter - Details

Taxation is at the centre of global development policy. It is widely recognised that a major improvement in the ability of developing countries to raise tax revenues will be necessary, if not sufficient, to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. At the same time, the tide of public opinion in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries continues to turn against tax evaders, and governments are introducing new legislation to crack down on tax evasion and avoidance, and increase transparency. The role that offshore financial centres (OFCs) can play in enabling tax evasion and avoidance is widely recognised, and it is easy to see why they attract such condemnation.

This report is concerned with the pragmatic consequences of the use of OFCs by Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) from a development perspective.

Economic Growth and Escaping the Poverty Trap: How Does Development Aid Work?

Read more: Economic Growth and Escaping the Poverty Trap: How Does Development Aid Work? (external link)
21 Nov 2017

2017/07 – Foundation pour les Etudes et Recherches sur le Développement International (FERDI); FERDI Working paper P197; Author(s): Ngoc-Sang Pham, Thi Kim Cuong Pham - Details

This paper introduces a theoretical framework for studying the effectiveness of aid for a recipient country, receiving aid to finance its public investment. It contributes to the debate on the nexus between aid and economic growth and in particular on the conditionality of aid effects. Focusing on autonomous technology, government effort, corruption in the use of aid, fixed cost and efficiency in public investment, we can distinguish 4 levels of circumstances following which, the same aid flows may have very different effects. Given donor’s rules, we determine conditions under which the foreign aid can generate economic growth in the long run for the recipient. We also discuss the conditions leading to an economic take-off and an escape from the poverty trap. Analyses of the dynamics of capital also give...

Confronting the Contradiction – An Exploration Into the Dual Purpose of Accountability and Learning in Aid Evaluation

Read more: Confronting the Contradiction – An Exploration Into the Dual Purpose of Accountability and Learning in Aid Evaluation (external link)
21 Nov 2017

2017/05 – Expert Group for Aid Studies (EBA); Rapport 2017:06; Author(s): Hilde Reinertsen, Kristian Bjørkdahl and Desmond McNeill - Details

Evaluation is a firmly rooted practice in international development cooperation. It is part and parcel of established routines in order to learn from experience and improve future undertakings. Evaluations also satisfy the need for accountability, i.e. ensuring that dedicated resources, whether they be human, financial or other, are well spent. At the same time, some argue that it is problematic for evaluation ascurrently practiced to contribute to both learning and accountability. In this EBA report three researchers from the Centre for Development and Environmentat the University of Oslo, Hilde Reinertsen,Kristian Bjørkdahl and Desmond McNeill have explored the dual nature of aid evaluation.

JUMP: Empowering Southern Researchers

Read more: JUMP: Empowering Southern Researchers
18 Oct 2017

Getting published in a high-ranked journal helps to sharpen individual academic skills and can be very beneficial for a scientific career.

EADI’s new Journal Mentoring Programme (JUMP) in cooperation with the European Journal of Development Research (EJDR), seeks to empower young researchers from the global South to publish in the EJDR. During the EADI NORDIC conference in Bergen, Norway, the first ever group of JUMP mentees attended several workshops and met their mentors.

Courting Catastrophe? Humanitarian Policy and Practice in a Changing Climate

Read more: Courting Catastrophe? Humanitarian Policy and Practice in a Changing Climate (external link)
10 Oct 2017

2017/08 – Institute of Development Studies (IDS), Brighton; IDS Bulletin; Author(s): Siri Eriksen et al. - Details

This IDS Bulletin is a call for increasing engagement between humanitarian aid and adaptation interventions to support deliberate transformation of development pathways. Based on studies from the ‘Courting Catastrophe’ project, contributors argue that humanitarian interventions offer opportunities for a common agenda to drive transformational adaptation. Changes in political and financial frameworks are needed to facilitate longer-term actions where demands move from delivering expert advice and solutions to vulnerable populations to taking up multiple vulnerability knowledges and making space for contestation of current development thinking.

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